The Amazon Pink Dolphin’s Voice: Mashco-Piro Photo Release: Uncontacted Amazon Tribe Had Killed Photographer’s Guide; Peru Issues Warning

Mashco-Piro Photo Release: Uncontacted Amazon Tribe Had Killed Photographer’s Guide; Peru Issues Warning

By AMRUTHA GAYATHRI: Subscribe to Amrutha’s RSS feed

February 2, 2012 4:11 AM EST

Following the release of the “most detailed sightings of uncontacted Indians ever recorded on camera” by the advocacy group Survival International Tuesday, the Peruvian authorities reported that the same tribe members (Mashco-Piro) had killed the tribal guide who was with the archaeologist who captured the photographs.

  • (Photo: Survival International / D. Cortijo)<br>The Mashco-Piro tribe is one of 100 uncontacted tribes said to exist around the world.<br /><br /><br /><br /> www.survivalinternational.com
(Photo: Survival International / D. Cortijo)
The Mashco-Piro tribe is one of 100 uncontacted tribes said to exist around the world. http://www.survivalinternational.com

The newly released photographs were taken by Spanish archeologist Diego Cortijo, a member of the Spanish Geographical Society, while on an expedition along the Madre de Dios River.

Cortijo had hired Nicolas “Shaco” Flores, a local Matsiguenka Indian, who had long maintained a relationship with the Mashco-Piro, as his guide. Flores invited the Cortijo and his teammates to spend a few days at his home, about two-hour boat ride from the tribal settlement, in November last year.

Mashco-Piro tribe members appeared on the riverbank across from Flores’s house one morning, during the stay and called out his name. Cortijo said that he made the photographs with a long lens and that he and Flores did not approach the tribe members.

Six days later Flores was killed when struck in the heart with a bamboo-tipped arrow as he tended a garden on an island in the middle of the Madre de Dios River, just outside the community of Diamante on the edge of the Manu Park.

“It was a complete shock,” Cortijo told Survival International, recalling the moment when he heard the news of the death on two-way radio at a ranger’s control post downriver. “I couldn’t believe my ears.”

The Peruvian officials said that the behavior of the members of the extremely reclusive tribe has baffled the environmentalists and researchers. The aggressive behavior of the Mashco-Piro tribe, according to scientists, may be a reaction to the encroachment of loggers and by low-altitude aircraft from nearby natural gas and oil exploration, the Associated Press reported.

The tribe also attacked and wounded a forest ranger in October last year. Though Peruvian authorities claim that the tribe display aggressiveness which is uncalled for, several reports suggest that the mahogany exports of the country have led to excessive encroachment into remote territories in the Amazon, which the tribe may have perceived as a threat to their existence.

Peru has been a leading exporter of big leaf mahogany to the U.S. ever since Bolivia and Brazil reduced Mahogany exports. The highly sought-after red colored wood, is protected under the CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora). However, the Peruvian mahogany traders have found ways to continue exports by means of illegal encroachment into remote Amazon territories. Rampant poaching is believed to have disturbed the tribe, which led them to believe that all outsiders are threat to their existence.

According to an AFP report Tuesday, Peruvian officials have asked outsiders to stay away from isolated Amazon basin rainforest natives after pictures of “uncontacted” tribe members were published online.

Source: International Business Times

‘Uncontacted’ Amazon Indians of Peru closely captured for first time

A campaign group has released the first ever ‘close up’ images of one of the world’s last uncontacted tribes – the Amazon Indians.

Clicked in Manu National Park, south-eastern Peru, the detailed images depict the daily life of a family from the Mashco-Piro tribe.

The Mashco-Piro are known to inhabit the park, but sightings of them have increased in recent months, the Daily Mail reported.

Illegal logging in the park and low flying helicopters from nearby oil and gas projects has been held responsible for driving the Indians from their forest homes.

The Mashco-Piro are one of around just 100 known uncontacted tribes who prefer not to have contact with the outside world. They lead a traditional life in the Peruvian forests and have little or no outside contact with the world.

Families within the tribes fashion tools from wood and other materials, including the teeth of animals.

The pictures show the adults and children wearing decorative loops around their wrists, knees and ankles – some of which can be used to carry tools.

The adult female is also seen sporting a form of skirt, which is thought to be made from pulped tree bark fibres.

The threat of attempting to establish contact with tribes who choose to remain isolated has recently been confirmed after the death of a nativeMatsigenka man.

Nicolas ‘Shaco’ Flores was shot in the heart by an arrow near the national park as he was leaving food and gifts for a small group of Mashco-PiroIndians, something that he had been doing for the past 20 years.

Source: Daily News & Analysis

Peru wants isolated tribes left alone

 

Mariela Huacchillo with the Peru’s office for Natural Protected Areas (SERNANP) told AFP that even indirect contact with the indigenous people could spread deadly viruses that do not exist in the region. The natives could also be hostile, she warned.

Huacchillo urged outsiders “to never attempt to enter in contact with these (isolated) communities,” whose people “are trying to remain apart from the outside world.”

The pictures, published on the website of pro-native NGO Survival International, shows a family of “uncontacted” Mascho-Piro people in the Manu National Park, in remote southeastern Peru on the border with Brazil.

The pictures were taken in late 2011 by an archeologist and Survival International sympathizer, the group said.

Huacchillo also urged people to not leave food, clothing or other gifts like locals or tourists sometimes do “with the goal of starting a contact with the isolated natives.”

In October a park ranger was lightly wounded by a blunt arrow fired by a Mascho-Piro native for getting too close to the natives. “It was a warning,” Huacchillo said.

A similar incident was recorded in 2010, when a teenager was wounded by a spear.

On their website, Survival International mentioned death late last year of one Nicolas “Shaco” Flores, a local resident who had been leaving food and gifts for a small group of Mashco-Piro natives for 20 years.

Flores was “shot by an uncontacted tribe’s arrow,” the group said.

The incident was never confirmed by Peruvian officials, including from Huacchillo’s office.

One year ago Survival International published pictures of an isolated native groups living on the Brazilian side of the border in the same Amazon rainforest region.

There are some 15 uncontacted native groups in Peru’s Amazon rainforest, according to government officials.

 

Survival International says there are 100 uncontacted native groups around the world.

Sightings of the Mashco-Piro have increased in recent months, according to Survival International.

“Many blame illegal logging in and around the park and low flying helicopters from nearby oil and gas projects, for forcibly displacing the indigenous people from their forest homes,” the activist group said.

Source: Calgary Herald

Peru struggles to keep Amazon tribe isolated

Authorities ask outsiders to stay away from uncontacted tribes amid growing encroachment on their native lands.

The Peruvian government has asked outsiders to stay away from the habitat of a clan of isolated Amazon tribes after an advocacy group published pictures of the tribe online.

Mariela Huacchillo, an official in Peru’s office for Natural Protected Areas (SERNANP), told the AFP news agency on Wednesday that the “uncontacted” tribe members were “trying to remain apart from the outside world”.

She urged outsiders not to attempt to enter into contact with the tribe, saying that among other fears is the possibility that even indirect contact with the indigenous people could spread deadly viruses that do not exist in the region.

Members of the tribe could also be hostile, she said.

Peruvian authorities say they are struggling to keep outsiders away from the clan of previously isolated Amazon tribes, who began appearing on the banks of a jungle river popular with environmental tourists last year.

The British-based advocacy group Survival International released photos on Tuesday showing clan members on the riverbank, describing the pictures as the “most detailed sightings of uncontacted Indians ever recorded on camera”.

The pictures, taken with the help of telescope, shows a family of “uncontacted” Mascho-Piro people in the Manu National Park, in remote southeastern Peru on the border with Brazil in the same Amazon rainforest region.

Habitat being encroached?

The advocacy group provided the photos exactly a year after releasing aerial photos from Brazil of another tribe classified as uncontacted, one of about 100 such groups it says exist around the world.

One of the Mashco-Piro photos was taken by a bird watcher in August last year, Survival International said. The other two were shot by Spanish archaeologist Diego Cortijo on November 16.

Sightings of the Mashco-Piro have increased in recent months, according to Survival International.

“Many blame illegal logging in and around the park and low flying helicopters from nearby oil and gas projects, for forcibly displacing the indigenous people from their forest homes,” the activist group said.

He said the Mashco-Piro were one of about 15 “uncontacted” tribes in Peru that together are estimated to number between 12,000 and 15,000 people living in jungles east of the Andes.

Beatriz Huerta, an anthropologist who works with Peru’s agency for indigenous affairs, said their habitat was becoming increasingly less isolated.

The clan that showed up at the river is believed to number about 60, including some 25 adults, said Carlos Soria, a professor at Lima’s Catholic University who ran Peru’s park protection agency last year.

Source:  Aljazeera

Madre de Dios: Indígenas aislados matan a un hombre de la comunidad nativa de Diamante

A unos ocho kilómetros de la comunidad nativa de Diamante, se encuentra la chacra de Nicolás Flores – conocido como “Shaco”. Cuando éste y otros indígenas se preparaban para cosechar plátanos y yucas, una flecha proveniente de la selva acabó con su vida. Era la mañana del 22 de noviembre del 2011.

 Nicolás Flores /Foto Archivo FENAMAD

Un grupo de indígenas en aislamiento voluntario en las inmediaciones de la comunidad nativa de Diamante, en el sector de Yanayacu, en la zona de amortiguamiento del Parque Nacional del Manu, hirió de muerte al comunero Nicolás Flores (65), conocido como “Shaco”, en el momento en que éste y un grupo de personas se dirigían a su chacra a recolectar yuca y plátano.

El suceso habría ocurrido entre las ocho y ocho y media de la mañana del martes 22 de noviembre, en circunstancias en que Miguel Vicente Sácaro (33), su esposa, Natalia Flores Días (22), y sus tres hijos menores de edad, acompañados con la víctima, acudieron al lugar para hacer el trabajo de campo.

“Shaco” murió casi instantáneamente. Sus acompañantes lograron huir del lugar poniendo a salvo sus vidas. El cuerpo fue recogido de la zona del deceso en horas de la tarde – aproximadamente a las 5:30pm- trasladándolo luego al salón comunal donde fue velado por familiares y amigos. Según Miguel Vicente Sácaro, uno de los testigos, él dice haber visto a un grupo de unos catorce indígenas aislados, entre hombres, mujeres y niños.

Para el presidente de la Federación Nativa del río Madre de Dios y Afluentes, FENAMAD, Jaime Corisepa, es lamentable que haya sucedido una muerte como ésta. Durante el último semestre se realizaron varios viajes a las comunidades nativas y centros poblados del alto Madre de Dios, con la finalidad de informar sobre las medidas de precaución – y peligros – que deberían tomarse en circunstancias en que el contacto con aislados es más latente, sobre todo después del accidente del 14 de octubre último en el que un guarda parque –Jesús Keme – fue herido por una flecha sin punta por los Mashco Piros.

Entre ellas se recomendó evitar el acercamiento a la zona de Yanayacu – declarado como Zona de Tránsito Fluvial Restringido según ordenanza 006-2011-GRMDD/CR -, y abandonar cualquier intento de comunicación con ellos a través del intercambio de ropas, alimentos u otros utensilios como machetes u ollas.

“Shaco” era reconocido en la comunidad nativa de Diamante – ubicada en el distrito de Fitzcarrald, provincia del Manu, región de Madre de Dios. Pertenecía al grupo étnico Matziguenka, por línea parental, aunque convivió durante muchos años con indígenas del grupo étnico Yine como sucedió en la comunidad nativa de Diamante. Durante sus últimos años en esta comunidad, vivió casi retirado del núcleo poblado haciendo chacra y dedicándose a su familia, a pocos metros del lindero donde se había visto desde mediados de marzo de este año consecutivamente a los aislados.

Este grupo indígena – denominado como Pueblos Indígenas en Aislamiento Voluntario, PIAV, según la ley nacional, subraya el hecho de su autonomía de vivir “aislados” del contacto con la sociedad mayor envolvente -, es conocido como “Mashco Piro” y es del tronco lingüístico Arawak.

Acciones conjuntas

 Tomando conocimiento del caso, el Presidente del Gobierno Regional de Madre de Dios, Luis Aguirre Pastor y el Vice Ministro Hugo Cabieses hicieron las gestiones del caso para disponer del traslado inmediato de una comisión para viajar hasta la comunidad nativa de Diamante.

El miércoles 23 de noviembre en la mañana se conformó una delegación presidida por el Gobierno Regional para viajar de emergencia al lugar. En la tarde del mismo día un helicóptero trasladó, desde Puerto Maldonado hasta Diamante, a la delegación integrada por el Vicepresidente del Gobierno Regional de Madre de Dios, Jorge Aldazábal Soto, el Gobernador de Madre de Dios, Gilbert Galindo, el Presidente de la Federación Nativa de Madre de Dios, Jaime Corisepa, la Consejera del Gobierno Regional, Luz Bario Santos, el Mayor Luis Puyo Ramos, Jefe de la Dirección de Investigación Policial, DIVINCRI-Madre de Dios, y en representación del Ministerio del Ambiente, Efraín Arana.

El objetivo del viaje fue calmar a la población para evitar futuros accidentes y muertes. Y tomar las medidas de urgencia que estaban dispuestas en normas que se había dado anteriormente – ver Anexo -, con la finalidad de proteger las vidas de los indígenas en aislamiento y de la población local no indígena nacional o extranjera.

Entre las acciones de contingencia tomadas por el Gobierno Regional de Madre de Dios, el Servicio Nacional de Áreas Naturales Protegidas SERNANP- Parque Nacional del Manu, la Federación Nativa del río Madre de Dios y Afluentes, FENAMAD, están las siguientes: (1) Enviar ayuda humanitaria a la familia damnificada (2) Dotar de medicamentos y personal especializado en el Puesto de Salud de Diamante (3) Evaluar la construcción de un Puesto de Control con la participación de la población local, en el sector de Yanayacu – donde ocurrió el accidente, – con el objetivo de prevenir y evitar futuros hechos que lamentar. Esta acción se haría en coordinación con el SERNANP – Parque Nacional del Manu y el Gobierno Regional de Madre de Dios y (4) Priorización de los proyectos de agua y desagüe u otros en los que esté comprometido la comunidad nativa de Diamante para su ejecución y rápida implementación.

Anexo

Debido a la sucesiva aparición de un grupo de indígenas en aislamiento voluntario en el sector denominado Yanayacu, ubicado en la zona de amortiguamiento del Parque Nacional del Manu, entre las comunidades nativas de Shipetiari y Diamante, el gobierno regional de Madre de Dios, declaró, temporalmente, como “Zona de Tránsito Fluvial Restringido” dicho sector.

La ordenanza, Nro. 006-2011-GRMDD/CR, publicado en el diario oficial El Peruano, el sábado primero de octubre del 2011, tiene como objetivo evitar un posible brote epidémico en la zona a partir de la interacción o contacto que pueda generar el intercambio de productos como ropa, alimentos u otros utensilios con los aislados.

Se dio la ordenanza regional 032-2010 GRMDDCR que declara de Interés Público Regional la Protección y Defensa de los Derechos de los Pueblos Indígenas en Aislamiento Voluntario y Contacto Inicial en la Región Madre de Dios.

Source: Fenamad.org.pe

SELVA Vida Sin Fronteras acknowledges Kevin Schafer’s important contribution towards protecting the highly endangered Amazon pink fresh water dolphin. Title photographs of our “The Amazon Pink Dolphin’s Voice” were taken by Mr. Schafer. 

 Editorial: Selvavidasinfronteras.org

Advertisements

~ by FSVSF Admin on 2 February, 2012.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: